"Finding Poetry in Today's Real Estate Market?"

Finding Poetry in Today's Market? 
In the June 14th edition of "Barron's" Steven M. Sears wrote an article entitled "Finding Poetry in Today's Market." Mr. Sears writes..."The Market is becoming a financial version of T.S. Eliot's Poem, The Hollow Men. The cacophony coming from the market's wheelhouse of thinkers and doers makes me think of Eliot's verse:

'...rat's feet over broken glass
In our dry cellar,
Shape without form,
shade without color,
Paralyzed force,
gesture without motion...' "

Mr. Sears continues "Eliot, as you know, was once a London Banker, which is probably when he perfected the lack of clarity that permeates his style and also happens to be the primary market theme. Volatilities rise and fall with great violence, often ending where they began. 'Rat's feet over broken glass.' "

While the stock market may be gloomy and volatile in Mr. Sear's eyes, to me, the NH waterfront real estate market is colorful and, yes, as volatile as human nature.

I work with many potential Buyers. Some look at NH Lakes Region real estate for days, others months and, still others, years. They flirt with the idea of buying property on and off, in bursts of activity. Many people decide that it isn't the right time for them to buy, due to future tax implications and other valid reasons. These bursts of activity toward finding a home are just the way that people naturally try to achieve their real estate goals while living busy lives.

The people who I see, who proceed to purchase a lake home have analyzed both the NH real estate market and the practicality if buying a lake home at this point in their life. Their dream to have a Lake Winnipesaukee or Squam Lake lakehouse supersedes concerns about short-term dips in the real estate market or worries about the economy. In short, they want to live their lives, and to include in their lives, that special lakefront property that will enhance their lives.

Not one person to whom I have sold a Lake Winnipesaukee lake home to has regretted it. How many sales people get to work in an environment where buyers' remorse is so scarce? Not many.

Despite this, getting to "yes" is rarely easy in the decision of purchasing a home.

My clients who prurchase lake homes in the current market, when they think in financial terms, tend to consider their purchase of NH lakefront property as an excellent hedge against inflation. If you can afford to buy Lake Winnipesaukee waterfront property, but decide not to buy a property, the particular properties, and maybe the Lakes Region, and the current timing, just are not for you.

The people who work with me, who look at real estate, but don't buy property, are at the very least, though, captivated by some of the properties while they are looking at them, even if they are in and out of the market so quickly they barely remember it. In the rapidly changing world of today, potential buyersThe waterfront market is becoming a real estate version of Robert Frost's "A Passing Glimpse."

"I often see flowers from a passing car
That are gone before I can tell what they are.

I want to get out of the train and go back
To see what they were beside the track.

I name all the flowers I am sure they weren't;
Not fireweed loving where woods have burnt--

Not bluebells gracing a tunnel mouth--
Not lupine living on sand and drouth.

Was something brushed across my mind
That no one on earth will ever find?

Heaven gives its glimpses only to those
Not in position to look too close."