Blog :: 09-2016

The Beautiful Wildlife Near 125 Windermere

Bald Eagle About to Fly Near 125 Windermere Road, Moultonborough, NH

An inviting neighborhood for wildlife and a protected bay with long views are some of the features home owners in the Windermere Association enjoy.  The Bald Eagle pictured here prefers the quiet and wooded areas around the Windermere Association. 

Flying from a tall tree on Winnipesaukee, the Bald Eagle is a stunning site!

While Eagles and Loons provide some of the most beautiful sites and sounds on Lake Winnipesaukee, the Loon Preservation Committee needs support to help keep Lake Winnipesaukee a home for these rare birds.

Slowing down for Loons when boating will help keep these birds a part of our NH history.

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services Fact Sheets have information on how to help keep Winnipesaukee clean.

If boating regulations, including speed limits are followed, this will go a long way to help keep wildlife safe on Winnipesaukee.  

2 loons ride the large weekend waves on Winnipesaukee.

Common courtesy for other boaters and and respect for the lake is critical in the long term survival of the lake.  With extraordinary warm weather and low gas prices the lake has been more inviting to boaters this summer.  By educating ourselves on practices to keep the lake clean, we can keep the lake beautiful for future generations.

In an election year, why not ask your candidates what they intend to do to help keep NH's lakes clean?  

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services and the New Hampshire Lakes Management and Protection Program  need very strong support from the legislature to do their job well and to keep our New Hampshire lakes and ponds healthy.  


Water conservation is a related issue that is especially important in drought years, such as 2016. Water Conservation Practice Fact Sheets can be found on the NH DES website regarding water conservation. The Fact Sheets WD-DWGB-26-18 - WD-DWGB-26-23 are especially helpful for homeowners.  Arsenic and bacteria levels can change in years that parts of drinking wells that are usually submerged become dry.  Ask your water or well company for information on water testing.